Food grade tubing question

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Food grade tubing question

Postby czubak » Fri Apr 17, 2015 11:50 am

Long story short. brewery is staying in the garage. I am installing a utility sink in my basement next to the keezer/ferm chamber. I am going to drill a hole in my header to allow me to drain my boil kettle down to my sink (into another kettle) to chill, then transfer into the carboy. Limited lifting of 5+ gallons and risking a slip and fall spilling wort all over the carpet is my main reasoning.

I am guessing I will need 25' or more tubing to get from A to B. Is there an alternative to silicone to transfer the boiling wort to it's final resting place. Trying to avoid $2.50/ft because I am a cheap ass. 1/2" ID
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby Matt F » Fri Apr 17, 2015 1:13 pm

I would think any food grade tubing would work for that. If chilled already in the garage, you don't need something with a high temperature rating either.

That is how I use to brew at my place before installing my ventilation system. I would brew in the garage and then chill and run off wort through the wall in to the basement. Worked really well. You should have a nice working setup with the addition of the utility sink in the garage. If my garage were bigger I may have stayed in there longer.
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby czubak » Fri Apr 17, 2015 2:26 pm

Matt, I am putting the sink in the basement and transferring 210 degree wort downstairs where I will chill.
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby DrPaulsen » Fri Apr 17, 2015 2:57 pm

Copper?
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby TappedOut » Fri Apr 17, 2015 7:01 pm

http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.a ... &catid=799 for $1.26/ft, though I like Lee's idea. You could put a larger plastic tube or garden hose on the outside, and your transfer pipe is also a counterflow chiller. Disclaimer - I ran into Tony at Lion Bridge and had a couple.
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby czubak » Sat Apr 18, 2015 5:52 am

Copper is expensive. I think I'd rather use tubing so I can remove it and clean it out.

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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby whitedj » Sat Apr 18, 2015 8:12 am

Pex?
The guy who submitted a barley wine in the Furious competition...
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby czubak » Sat Apr 18, 2015 11:14 am

Too rigid IMO. May go shopping today to see what's out there. Likely just go silly-cone


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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby Matt F » Sat Apr 18, 2015 10:12 pm

You could link hoses you already use to shorten your length requirement. I do that for one of my connections during my brew session to make two short hoses one long one.
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby czubak » Sun Apr 19, 2015 7:36 am

Possible Matt but my setup now is literally one hose that's 3' long.

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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby tony b » Sun Apr 19, 2015 10:41 am

You might want to consider a semi-rigid tubing over silicone, something that won't sag somewhere in the middle and create a low point that might be hard to clean. Or, as suggested, you could run the silicone inside another rigid tube (PVC) that would be permanently installed. Challenge would be to find a simple, easy method to snake the silicone tube through it, assuming that you wanted to take it back out to clean and not clean in-situ.
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby czubak » Sun Apr 19, 2015 5:18 pm

Love that you guys over think it as much or more as myself. :)

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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby czubak » Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:22 am

whitedj wrote:Pex?

Found this

PEX tube material is durable under the extremes of temperature and is a great material for other applications and hot water. The PEX tube is intended for hot and cold potable water distribution systems.
Maximum Safe Temperature

The tube can withstand a maximum heat temperature of 200 degrees Fahrenheit for applications for heating. In a plumbing project, the PEX is able to stand a maximum heat of up to 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Usually, the highest temperature limitation is listed on the PEX tubing in small prints. All of the PEX tubing systems are tested, and you can use them with the standard P and T relief valves, which are able to be used at 210 degrees Fahrenheit.
Advantages

The strength and flexibility of PEX tubing make it the most ideal material to use for piping. Not only can it withstand a maximum heat temperature of up till 200 degrees, but it can also withstand temperatures below freezing. It is widely used in cold and hot water plumbing systems, radiant hydronic heating systems, and applications for snow melting. PEX tubing is so popular to use and so significant that it is even used in refrigeration warehouses and ice rinks because of the temperatures it can endure.
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby tony b » Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:31 am

Can't contain the Engineer in me! Present me a problem, and I gotta try and solve it! It's what we do!! 8)
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Re: Food grade tubing question

Postby czubak » Mon Apr 20, 2015 11:33 am

tony b wrote:Can't contain the Engineer in me! Present me a problem, and I gotta try and solve it as cheaply as possible! It's what we do!! 8)


I added how my Engineering mind works. :)
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